About the author  ⁄ Garrett Webb

by Chelsea Arnott, CGAPS Planner   What if we knew about Miconia’s invasive impacts elsewhere and had been able to restrict it from importation and sale in Hawai`i? Today, we have the knowledge and tools to assess a plant’s potential to be invasive before it arrives, but we lack a regulatory mechanism to keep them out. Stemming in part from past LICH President Boyd Ready’s request to have a single list for prevention, the Coordinating Group on Alien Plant Species (CGAPS) has been working to develop a proposed State Restricted Plant List and set of rules that would reduce the risk of some future invasive plant introductions for Hawai`i. Historically, Hawaii’s geographic isolation limited the number of plants that were able to arrive and establish.  Since Western contact 240 years ago, more than 8,000 species of plants have been introduced to the islands. The majority of these have been either beneficial or at least benign. However, of those plants that became invasive to Hawaii’s natural areas, the majority (>80%) were intentionally introduced.... ...

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Fellowship is among the highest honors the ASLA bestows on members and recognizes the contributions of these individuals to their profession and society at large based on their works, leadership and management, knowledge, and service. The designation of Fellow is conferred on individuals in recognition of exceptional accomplishments over a sustained period of time. Individuals considered for this distinction must be full members of ASLA in good standing for at least ten years and must be recommended to the Council of Fellows by the Executive Committee of their local chapter, the Executive Committee of the ASLA, or the Executive Committee of the Council of Fellows. Christopher Dacus, ASLA City and County of Honolulu (Retired) Honolulu Christopher Dacus received his nomination, in Service, from the Hawaii Chapter. Now retired, Dacus worked for the Hawaii Department of Transportation and Honolulu Department of Parks and Recreation for 18 years, contributing immeasurably to the improvement of the state’s open spaces and the preservation of its natural beauty. Devoted to his community and his profession,... ...

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  This year’s Landscape Industry Certified Technician (LICT) program for Oahu was in limbo as earlier in the year, word got out that the LICT program was to come to an end in April of 2019. However, many thought that the training and exam for 2018 was cancelled even though registration for training and the exam was posted on the Landscape Industry Council of Hawaii’s (LICH) website. With less than two weeks before the start of the classes, it was not clear if this year’s program was a go and registration for training was filling up. So, the committee needed to decide if the training should continue as the presenters needed to be confirmed, volunteers and sponsors recruited, and promotion for more participants conducted. Three weeks later, the classes started. Overall, there were 25 participants and the classes were held at the Pearl City Urban Garden Center, Pacific Pipe Company, and the University of Hawaii Waimanalo Research Station. On the week of the exam, the candidates, judges, volunteers, and sponsors... ...

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Over 175 landscapers attended this year’s 2018 LICH Green Industry Conference and Tradeshow. The day started with an inspired look to our future as the Dean of the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, Nicholas Comerford, explored the potential collaboration between the College and the landscape industry. Speakers Frank Sekiya and Dr. Joseph DeFrank broke new ground by providing talks with a strong hands-on component. Video feed (by Chris Dacus) allowed those attending their talks to see up close and personal the grafting techniques being taught in both these classes. J.B. Friday and Dr. Zhiqiang Cheng brought us up to date in Rapid O’hi’a Death and Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle. We also were able to vertually travel to Wake Atol with Heidi Bornhorst; investigate control of incipient invasive plants on Oahu with Erin Bishop; and ponder the conversion of prolific seed producing ornamental trees to seedless varieties with Ken Leonhardt. It was a day of fellowship and learning that challenged us to look differently at the work we perform for... ...

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The 2018 Field Test for Oahu is On! The Hands-On Test is scheduled for AUGUST 25, 2018. The LICT Training Classes start date has been changed to June 26th! Written tests: Thursday, August 23rd Go to the Training Page, click here, to register for the classes or to check out the new schedule. Thanks to the Certification Committee and HLICA for finding a way to get the test reinstated for this year. If you are certified and not adding a module this year, be sure to get in touch with Brandon Au at bau@honolulu.gov to help in any way you can from set up to Judging for this year’s test. Volunteers are needed! For Test Registration Forms for the Oahu 2018 LICT test, go to the LICT Test Registration Page: click here ...

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A letter from Mayor Harry Kim of the Big Island states: “It is my pleasure to nominate Kenneth Sugai of Council District 6 to the Water Board. Mr. Sugal is the Managing Member of Keauhou Nursery, LLC. His past work experiences include being a manager at Hawaii Community Federal Credit Union, sales at Big Island Honda Kona and a vacation counselor at Hilton Grand Vacations. Mr. Sugai, a graduate of Konawaena High School, attended the University of Hawai’ i. Active in the community, Mr. Sugai is presently the President of the Hawaii Island Landscape Association, Vice President at Ka Ohana o Honu’ apo, a nonprofit organization that works towards the restoration, improvements, maintenance and protection of the historical and cultural sites’ of Honu’ apo Park.” This year has seen several well failures and emergency water restrictions. If Kona is going to maintain a vibrant and tropical landscape for residents and visitors alike, having a landscaper on the Water Board is more important than ever. Congratulations, Ken! ...

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A Native Plant Garden Grows For 30 Years In Wailea In the south end of Wailea, nestled between two resorts, is Wailea Point, a private community filled with manicured lawns, lush tropical gardens, and canopies of mature trees and palms.  When construction began in the mid-1980’s the coastline of this property was rugged lava rock cliffs full of kiawe and other weeds.  As part of the master plan of the Wailea resort community, an ocean side walkway connecting resorts, condominiums, beaches and public parking was to be maintained by each property. Hundreds of visitors pass through this ocean walk daily, taking in the view, jogging, or just on a morning stroll.  Having previously been the gardener for this area of Wailea Point, I can tell you the most common questions from these passers-by include “What type of lawn is that?” – Seashore paspalum.  “What island is that?” – It’s still Maui.  If you drive around that mountain you get to Lahaina.  “Where’s the nearest place to get coffee?” – Well…. ... ...

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Biomimicry: Innovation in Landscape Design By Wynton Wizinowich and Micah Barker How can we achieve that beautiful landscape desired by our clients while also reducing water consumption, pollution, and the ever-increasing cost of maintenance? Over the last 7 years while working for Bio-Scape Hawaii LLC, we have developed sustainable alternatives to conventional landscape practices. Through careful observation of natural ecosystems, we apply innovative design in built urban and residential environments. We couple our unconventional approach with high-end, naturally beautiful landscapes personalized for the client while also reducing water and labor by up to 75%. We achieve this through biomimicry, the learning from and then emulating natures forms, processes, and ecosystems to create more sustainable designs. There are countless ways to apply biomimicry, and if you study it closely, you will find many natural secrets to give you the edge in your projects. In this article, however, we strive to just share our key methods, the logic behind them and their benefits. Soil is far more complicated than even the leading... ...

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