Hawaii’s Plant Extinction Prevention Program

Saving Native Species with Teamwork! Hawai‘i’s Plant Extinction Prevention Program saves rare native plants through team- work. When the last remaining individuals of a rare plant species are dis- covered, they can be protected, propagated, and planted back out into secure areas to reclaim their role in native ecosystems. Hawai‘i’s Plant Extinction Prevention Program saves rare native plants through team- work. When the last remaining Without this intervention, more native plants would have gone extinct. The Hawaiian Islands are the most isolated land masses on Earth. This isolation has created a biological hotspot where approximately 90% of the native flora is endemic (found nowhere else in the world). Hawai‘i’s unique flora is at risk of extinction, primarily due to the ongoing impacts of invasive alien species. Now, Hawai‘i has the regrettable distinction of being “the endangered species capital of the world,” home to 40% of all endangered plants in the United States. Although Hawai‘i has less than 1% of the landmass in the United States, there are 425 Threatened or... ...

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Devil Weed: Another Plant from Hell in Hawaii

By Franny Kinslow Brewer, Communications Director for the Big Island Invasive Species Committee (BIISC) Siam weed, bitter bush, jack in the bush, masigig, huluhagonoi, and triffid weed…no matter what common name you call it, Chromolaena odorata is named as one of the world’s worst 100 invasive species on the planet. So, when it popped up on O‘ahu in 2011 this plant from hell was referred to as devil weed here in Hawai‘i. Native Devil weed is native to South and Central America, the American Tropics, and the United States (Florida and Texas only ). It was first detected on O‘ahu by the Army Natural Resources Program during routine plant surveys at the Kahuku Training Area (KTA) in 2011. Following this initial detection, the Hawai‘i Pacific Weed Risk Assessment evaluated this plant species and calculated a score of 28 suggesting the potential to become highly invasive in Hawai‘i. This really isn’t a big surprise though. Devil weed has been rapidly invading lands from SE Asia, West Africa and South Africa, Australia... ...

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Larry Borgatti Interview

Interview with Larry Borgatti, Irrigation Technician, Arborist, & Landscaper by Dr. James Keach, Associate Extension Agent for Ornamental Crops in Kauai County JK: What is your current position and role? LB: Right now I’m an irrigation technician for the County of Kaua‘i. I take care of all the irrigation systems for Parks & Recreation. I’ve been doing this for about 6 years. Prior to that I had my own business as a landscape contractor. How did you get started both in land- scape and then transitioning over to this position? I went to college to get a degree in horticulture. When I graduated I got a 3 month internship here on Kaua‘i at a botanical garden that’s now closed. That was in ‘82 and I’m still here! After a 3-month internship I decided to stay. Awesome! That’s a nice connection. I mean, what do you do after graduating college? One of my professors told me about an internship in Hawai‘i and I thought ‘Go for it!’ and never looked back.... ...

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Latest Issue Hawaii Landscape Magazine

Here is the latest issue of the Hawaii Landscape Magazine ready for download to read on your iPad, Lap Top or Computer. Hawaii Landscape is mailed to 5,000 addresses every two months. If you are not receiving the magazine by post, send us an email. It is a free publication. If you want to submit an article go to story submittal. ...

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Chuck with the Truck

“Chuck with the truck” is a term for a unqualified company pretending to be a professional contractor by having the appearance of being a professional with equipment and vehicles but not the knowledge, training and skills. For the landscape contractor, there is a license administered by the State of Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs, but a majority of landscape companies are not licensed. For landscape professional there is no college “Bachelors of Landscape Construction.” Being certified is the best way to differentiate yourself from “Chuck with a truck.” Certification is proof you know what you are doing or at the very least you have minimum competency to perform the task. It provides a foundation and demonstrates your commitment to being a landscape professional. Being certified gives you job mobility and is transferable anywhere in the United States. Certification gives you instant credibility. It gives you a competitive edge for employment and it is the #1 qualification. It greatly increases your chance of promotion and advancement in the industry.... ...

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