Review Category : All Posts

Hawaii’s Plant Extinction Prevention Program

Saving Native Species with Teamwork! Hawai‘i’s Plant Extinction Prevention Program saves rare native plants through team- work. When the last remaining individuals of a rare plant species are dis- covered, they can be protected, propagated, and planted back out into secure areas to reclaim their role in native ecosystems. Hawai‘i’s Plant Extinction Prevention Program saves rare native plants through team- work. When the last remaining Without this intervention, more native plants would have gone extinct. The Hawaiian Islands are the most isolated land masses on Earth. This isolation has created a biological hotspot where approximately 90% of the native flora is endemic (found nowhere else in the world). Hawai‘i’s unique flora is at risk of extinction, primarily due to the ongoing impacts of invasive alien species. Now, Hawai‘i has the regrettable distinction of being “the endangered species capital of the world,” home to 40% of all endangered plants in the United States. Although Hawai‘i has less than 1% of the landmass in the United States, there are 425 Threatened or... ...

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Hawaiiscape Webinar Series

“Bringing the voice of the Green Industry to you” LICH educational webinar series that expands on topics in the Hawaii Landscape Magazine. Upcoming  LICH Webinar Please join LICH for the upcoming LICH webinar on December 14th, 3-4 pm via Zoom. This webinar features three presenters. Dr. Art Medeiros will discuss native species in Hawaii, restoration ecology, the Auwahi project, and the role of Hawai’i’s green industry. Dr. Orville Baldos will expand on his personal experience navigating the rules and regulations surrounding the collecting and selling of Hawaiian native plants. The Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle Response Team will update viewers on the spread and management of CRB in Hawaii. CEU’s  Up to 1/2 RUP CEU’s, 1 LICT CEU, and 1 ISA CEU available   This webinar features three presenters. Dr. Art Medeiros will discuss native species in Hawaii, restoration ecology, the Auwahi project, and the role of Hawai’i’s green industry. Dr. Orville Baldos will expand on his personal experience navigating the rules and regulations surrounding the collecting and selling of Hawaiian native plants. The Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle Response Team will... ...

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Companies with Landscape Industry Certified Employed

If you are looking for a Landscape Company that employs, of is owned by, a National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) Landscape Industry Certified Technician or Manager, here is a List of Companies, their address and the Certifications their employees hold; Irrigation, Turf Maintenance, Ornamental Maintenance and /or Softscape Installation. Download the 2020 List here. ...

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Biomimicry: Innovation in Landscape Design

Biomimicry: Innovation in Landscape Design By Wynton Wizinowich and Micah Barker How can we achieve that beautiful landscape desired by our clients while also reducing water consumption, pollution, and the ever-increasing cost of maintenance? Over the last 7 years while working for Bio-Scape Hawaii LLC, we have developed sustainable alternatives to conventional landscape practices. Through careful observation of natural ecosystems, we apply innovative design in built urban and residential environments. We couple our unconventional approach with high-end, naturally beautiful landscapes personalized for the client while also reducing water and labor by up to 75%. We achieve this through biomimicry, the learning from and then emulating natures forms, processes, and ecosystems to create more sustainable designs. There are countless ways to apply biomimicry, and if you study it closely, you will find many natural secrets to give you the edge in your projects. In this article, however, we strive to just share our key methods, the logic behind them and their benefits. Soil is far more complicated than even the leading... ...

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Kona 2017 LICT Test a Success / 13 New LICTs

On June 17th the Landscape Industry Certified Technician (LICT) Test was held in Kona at the University of Hawaii CTAHR Experiment Station in Kainaliu, with thanks to the dedication and hard work on the part of the Board of Directors of the Hawaii Island Landscape Association (HILA).Tests were conducted in Ornamental Maintenance, Softscape Installation and Irrigation. The test started with a traditional pule, blessing our candidates and volunteer judges for a safe and successful day. Then the candidates went to work, showing their skills learned from the Landscape Maintenance Training program and Test Prep Intensive day that most participated in. Candidates passing the test and receiving their LICT certifications are as follows: In Ornamental Maintenance: Bruce Costello of Bruce Costello Landscape Maintenance Clinton Hirayasu of Kukio Community Association Daniel E. Damazo of MLM LLC Melvin K. Thomas Jr. of MLM LLC James Spencer of Chambers Landscape and Irrigation Rocco Mico-Talen of Bezona Botanical Nephi Brown of Four Season Resort Hualalai Zachary Price of Landes Home Service Sean Prentiss self-employed In... ...

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UH Focuses Research Efforts to Crush the Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle in Hawai’i

by Keith Weiser, Ph.D. Something has been munching on Oahu’s palm trees and UH researchers are testing some innovative approaches to stop it. The coconut rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros) AKA CRB was found on Oahu for the first time in December of 2013 and a multi-agency response has been combating the invasive insect to eradicate it from Hawai’i. This native of Southeast Asia lays eggs in decaying plant material like mulch or compost and the eggs hatch into larvae that feed on the decaying material. After growing and feeding for several months, the ~3 inch long white larvae go through metamorphosis to become adult beetles. The adults are ~2 inch black beetles with a distinctive horn on their head. The adults emerge at night and fly to palm trees to feed. Coconut trees (Cocos nucifera) are their favorites but they will feed on a variety of palms and other plants including date palms (Phoenix sp.), native Hawaiian palms (Pritchardia sp.), sugar cane (Saccharum sp.), and many common landscaping palms. When... ...

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Olena and Turmeric Research at UH

Dr. Ted Radovich, Principal investigator of sustainable and organic farming systems laboratory associate prof, since 2006 Article by Heidi Bornhorst Olena or turmeric (Curcuma longa) syn. C. domestica, SE Asia, is one of our Hawaiian canoe plants. We have long valued and used it here in Hawaii.  It is a bit tricky to grow and perpetuate since it goes dormant in the winter time. It has very pretty flowers which we call ‘Pua Olena’ here in Hawaii.  We even have a mele and hula about Turmeric.  The leaves are attractive and grow separately from the flowers stalks, which emerge in late summer, after the leaves have been growing for a while. You can use the roots (rhizomes actually) for many recipes.  I grate mine with a micro planer, as I’m cooking and to add to drinks.  I keep the precious and ono rhizomes in the freezer until I’m ready to cook with them. “Poor man’s saffron” turmeric is another name for Olena It is the Base for common English /... ...

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Developing New Selections Native Hawaiian Plants for Landscape and Interior Use

This article, with more photos, appeared in the May/June Issue of Hawaii Landscape By Orville C. Baldos, CTAHR Research Support Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences In recent years, the promotion and use of native plants as ornamentals has increased steadily in both local and national levels due to growing awareness of water use issues, biodiversity conservation, invasive species spread, storm water management and the need to provide suitable habitats for pollinators and other wildlife. In Hawaii, the use of native plants in landscaping projects has tremendously increased since the first efforts to promote native plants in public landscaping was passed into law in 1992. Today, native plants such as naupaka (Scaevola taccada), ‘uki‘uki (Dianella sandwicensis), pohinahina (Vitex rotundifolia), O’ahu sedge (Carex wahuensis), ‘ilima (Sida fallax), ilie’e (Plumbago zeylanica) and ‘akia (Wikstroemia uva ursi) have become commonplace in many installed designs.   Despite the widespread use and acceptance of native Hawaiian plants in landscaping, there is still a very limited number of species/selections available at many nurseries. The lack... ...

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