Review Category : All Posts

Proclamation: Governor Proclaims July LICH Irrigation Conservation Month

At our October 2009 LICH conference, at the Blaisdell, while still LICH President, I called for a new committee to see what could be done to improve water conservation, especially in landscape uses, for Hawaii.  Several dedicated committee members stepped up, including Alan Schildknecht, of Irrigation Consultants, Mel Villoria of HISCO, Lanky Morrill of DLNR, Cat Sawai of BWS, and Neal Fujii of the State Water Commission. We met every month and discussed what could be done.  I was especially interested in finding ways to encourage the use of simple but effective sensors and new timers that automatically adjust watering cycles to local weather conditions.  Others who came and participated in the discussions included Richard Quinn of Helber, Hastert & Fee, and Matt Flach, the landscape architect for Pearl Harbor, ands at the 2010 conference, Elson Gushiken of Irrigation Technology Corporation.  We participated in the County of Maui’s development of new landscape codes.  We provided text for a possible Hawaii legislative resolution in 2010.  After Chris Dacus came on board,... ...

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Pest Roundup

Preventing new pests from entering our islands protects our environment, economy, and health, and it is a building block to a sustainable Hawaiʻi. Here are some prevention initiatives. New Pest Poster Available The landscape industry provides our state with more than 11,000 on-the-ground eyes and ears that can help protect Hawaiʻi from new pests.  To help identify some of the most unwanted landscape and nursery pests in the United States, the University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) has produced a new poster.  The poster contains photos and descriptions of sixteen insect pests, their host plants, and known distribution.  Some of the featured pests include palm-killers like the red palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus) and coconut rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros), and the lobate lac scale (Paratachardina pseudolobata), which officials in Florida consider one of the most devastating pests of trees and shrubs ever introduced.  New detections of these or other pests should be reported to the Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture Pest Hotline at 643-PEST (643-7378).  For a... ...

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What is your definition of sustainability?

Being sustainable means many things to many people. As a business person, what is your definition of sustainability? Do you practice sustainability? Do your customers care about your sustainable business practices? Have you told them about your practices? Is there a connection between sustainability and government affairs? The answer is yes there is. One of the key aspects of sustainability in government affairs activity is in using best management practices (BMPs) in your agronomic or environmental practices. Many of the best practices have to do with the protection of water quality; some with saving water through how the landscape is designed. Within the industry, many are concerned that if these practices get defined for us by others, it’ll be through laws or regulations. Some people think they can save money by close scrutiny and adoption of the right BMPs. What is becoming obvious is that saving money and using BMPs does not have to be an all or nothing activity. For example, some people push native vegetation. If the customer... ...

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Tool Tips

  This is the first in a series of articles starting with troubleshooting and ending with how to replace the broken tool:  1. It’s broken, 2. Now what—repair or replace; 3. so what should I buy?  We hope that you  will be able to relate to these situations,  and that the suggestions will be helpful to you. WHAT?  IT’S BROKEN! You’re sitting in your office or driving to your next job, when you get the dreaded call—your employee says the piece of equipment he was using stopped working—“it just died”.   Your first question—what happened?  The invariable response, “I don’t know; it just stopped”. THE NEXT FEW QUESTIONS ARE THE KEYS TO UNRAVELING THE MYSTERY 1.    What stopped?  Did the engine stop?  If it’s a mower, did the mower blades stop?  Was it under load when it stopped?   It is essential to narrow down the problem.   the more specific you can be, the closer you can get to the source of the trouble—ask the right questions. What were you doing... ...

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Malama ‘Aina Nanakuli Style: The NFL Youth Education Town Hawaii

In the last couple of years a number of interesting articles have been written about the new NFL Youth Education Town Hawaii facility in Nanakuli.  While most articles have focused on the building and its Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii programs none has focused on its landscape and gardens. The National Football League Youth Education Town (NFL YET) Hawaii, built on 1.61 acres of Hawaiian Home Lands located next to Nanaikapono Elementary School in Nanakuli, is a legacy of the NFL Pro Bowl, which has been played in Hawaii since 1980.  It will be the only YET facility built outside a Super Bowl host city. The NFL YET’s are designed to help youngsters succeed by providing educational assistance, job training, technical instruction, life-skills development, and fitness and recreational outlets. The 10,000-square foot facility is managed by the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii, which serves more than 14,000 youngsters on Oahu and Kauai, ages 7-17, with programs designed to inspire and enable them to realize their full potential as... ...

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The Low Hanging Fruit: Canistel: One Sapote to Rule Them All!

The Low Hanging Fruit: Canistel: One Sapote to Rule Them All! By Adam Williams   The Canistel, also sometimes called the Yellow Sapote, is probably the showiest member of its family, Sapotaceae. I’ll be honest, this has never been my favorite tropical fruit, but it has always intrigued me, and is certainly deserving of more attention, in the back yard and commercially. I say it’s not my favorite because I love the concept of a perfect, delicious fruit to be eaten fresh out of hand (mostly because I am not fond of cooking). Although many would consider its ripe flesh quite delectable, the Canistel really shines with a little preparation, but more on that later. It is often fruiting in Hawaii during late Winter/early Spring (about now, hence my inspiration to write about it for this issue) and is more common than the average resident may be aware of. This time of year, look for fist-sized, oblong, shiny, bright yellowy-orange fruits contrasting with the thick, dark green foliage; they stand... ...

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New LICH Native Plant Poster

LICH announces new double sided color native plant poster. The poster features 36 native plants perfect for your projects. The front is designed for retail locations showing large pictures and featuring a QR code. The back of the poster includes detailed horticultural information and features information on the ethical use of native plants. Click here for the LICH Native Plant Poster, a 13″ by 17″ reduced size PDF of the native plant poster ...

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