Review Category : All Posts

Tool Tips

  This is the first in a series of articles starting with troubleshooting and ending with how to replace the broken tool:  1. It’s broken, 2. Now what—repair or replace; 3. so what should I buy?  We hope that you  will be able to relate to these situations,  and that the suggestions will be helpful to you. WHAT?  IT’S BROKEN! You’re sitting in your office or driving to your next job, when you get the dreaded call—your employee says the piece of equipment he was using stopped working—“it just died”.   Your first question—what happened?  The invariable response, “I don’t know; it just stopped”. THE NEXT FEW QUESTIONS ARE THE KEYS TO UNRAVELING THE MYSTERY 1.    What stopped?  Did the engine stop?  If it’s a mower, did the mower blades stop?  Was it under load when it stopped?   It is essential to narrow down the problem.   the more specific you can be, the closer you can get to the source of the trouble—ask the right questions. What were you doing... ...

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Malama ‘Aina Nanakuli Style: The NFL Youth Education Town Hawaii

In the last couple of years a number of interesting articles have been written about the new NFL Youth Education Town Hawaii facility in Nanakuli.  While most articles have focused on the building and its Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii programs none has focused on its landscape and gardens. The National Football League Youth Education Town (NFL YET) Hawaii, built on 1.61 acres of Hawaiian Home Lands located next to Nanaikapono Elementary School in Nanakuli, is a legacy of the NFL Pro Bowl, which has been played in Hawaii since 1980.  It will be the only YET facility built outside a Super Bowl host city. The NFL YET’s are designed to help youngsters succeed by providing educational assistance, job training, technical instruction, life-skills development, and fitness and recreational outlets. The 10,000-square foot facility is managed by the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii, which serves more than 14,000 youngsters on Oahu and Kauai, ages 7-17, with programs designed to inspire and enable them to realize their full potential as... ...

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The Low Hanging Fruit: Canistel: One Sapote to Rule Them All!

The Low Hanging Fruit: Canistel: One Sapote to Rule Them All! By Adam Williams   The Canistel, also sometimes called the Yellow Sapote, is probably the showiest member of its family, Sapotaceae. I’ll be honest, this has never been my favorite tropical fruit, but it has always intrigued me, and is certainly deserving of more attention, in the back yard and commercially. I say it’s not my favorite because I love the concept of a perfect, delicious fruit to be eaten fresh out of hand (mostly because I am not fond of cooking). Although many would consider its ripe flesh quite delectable, the Canistel really shines with a little preparation, but more on that later. It is often fruiting in Hawaii during late Winter/early Spring (about now, hence my inspiration to write about it for this issue) and is more common than the average resident may be aware of. This time of year, look for fist-sized, oblong, shiny, bright yellowy-orange fruits contrasting with the thick, dark green foliage; they stand... ...

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New LICH Native Plant Poster

LICH announces new double sided color native plant poster. The poster features 36 native plants perfect for your projects. The front is designed for retail locations showing large pictures and featuring a QR code. The back of the poster includes detailed horticultural information and features information on the ethical use of native plants. Click here for the LICH Native Plant Poster, a 13″ by 17″ reduced size PDF of the native plant poster ...

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Feeling the Urge to Write a Native Plant Article?

Well look no further, the next issue of Landscape Hawaii magazine is our native plant issue featuring a free native plant poster. The magazine has a readership of 20,450 and is mailed to 6,000 addresses every two months. Our audience is the Hawaii landscape professionals. If you would like to write an article for next issue of Landscape Hawaii magazine, please choose a topic below and write either 600-750 words or 1200-1500 words. Submit 2-3 jpeg images at a minimum size of 1 MB. For an article submission example visit us online at: http://hawaiiscape.wpengine.com/landscape-hawaii-magazine Topics we would love to see articles address (but feel free to write to another topic): • Great native plant alternatives to popular ornamentals • How to ethically and legally collect native plants • Native plant propagation and seed storage • Review of the best native plant resources – books, native nurseries and websites. • Designing with native plant communities • How to design Ethnobotanical gardens • The ethical use of Native plant guidelines (monoculture vs diversity,... ...

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Why Certification Is The Future of Turf in Hawaii

Many industries offer consumers a variation on the Better Homes & Gardens Seal of Approval, a J.D. Power rating, or some type of third-party verification that what they’re buying is the real deal. In the turf industry, our method is Certification. Here in Hawaii, grasses are certified by the Hawaii Department of Agriculture. Why is this important? The hinge-pin to Certification is determining the genetic purity of production fields of a given turfgrass variety. Let’s look at El Toro Zoysia, for example, a long-time standard for lawn grass in Hawaii. Just a few years ago, the Patent for El Toro expired. Once a variety’s Patent expires there is no way to enforce Certification requirements, thus any producer anywhere and at any time can expand production from any source, to any field, without the source field or the expansion field having to be inspected for off-type grasses and/or mutants within the population. Without Certification, there ceases to be any oversight as to the quality and purity of the grass that is... ...

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Turf Grass Certification in Hawaii

The Hawaii Dept of Agriculture, Commodities Branch of the Quality Assurance Division is the official designated agency of the Association of Official Seed Certifying Agencies (AOSCA) to certify vegetative propagated turf grasses such as Bermudas, Centipede, Zoysia, St. Augustine and Seashore Paspalum.  The life of the stand for classes of foundation registered or certified turf grasses will continue as long as the varietal and mechanical purity for the class is maintained. Why certify turf grasses?   To assure buyers that they are getting the variety of turf grasses that is of genetic purity. It is usually a requirement by the licensing agency for turf grass varieties to be certified.  Varieties that are certified are usually Mainland certified or registered sod sprigs. The following are procedures for the applicant to get the turf grass to be certified.  The applicant will submit to the certifying agency (Hawaii Dept of Agriculture): the name and address of the applicant requesting for the service, the name of breeder of the variety, the variety name, the origin... ...

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