Review Category : Landscape Hawaii Magazine

Environmentally Friendly – Integrated Pest Management in the Sustainable Landscape

IPM (integrated pest management) is a good choice for sound solutions in dealing with pests. IPM promotes safe, least-toxic solutions to both pest and pesticide problems. What can IPM do for you? IPM helps you deal with pests, insects, and plant diseases with methods that help keep health and environmental risks as low as possible. IPM is integrated because it brings together, or integrates, a range of biological, organic, cultural, mechanical, and chemical options for pest problems. And it’s about management because you can only manage pests, you can’t eliminate them. Integrated pest management rarely relies on just one tactic, it integrates tactics to reduce pests to levels you can live with. The basics of IPM are as follows: Step 1: Be prepared, know your pests: What pests can you expect and how can you avoid them? Learn which tactics work, and under which conditions, when pests show up in your landscape. Learn about the beneficial organisms that can help you out. Step 2: Think prevention: It’s the first step... ...

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Pest Roundup

Preventing new pests from entering our islands protects our environment, economy, and health, and it is a building block to a sustainable Hawaiʻi. Here are some prevention initiatives. New Pest Poster Available The landscape industry provides our state with more than 11,000 on-the-ground eyes and ears that can help protect Hawaiʻi from new pests.  To help identify some of the most unwanted landscape and nursery pests in the United States, the University of Hawaiʻi College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources (CTAHR) has produced a new poster.  The poster contains photos and descriptions of sixteen insect pests, their host plants, and known distribution.  Some of the featured pests include palm-killers like the red palm weevil (Rhynchophorus ferrugineus) and coconut rhinoceros beetle (Oryctes rhinoceros), and the lobate lac scale (Paratachardina pseudolobata), which officials in Florida consider one of the most devastating pests of trees and shrubs ever introduced.  New detections of these or other pests should be reported to the Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture Pest Hotline at 643-PEST (643-7378).  For a... ...

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What is your definition of sustainability?

Being sustainable means many things to many people. As a business person, what is your definition of sustainability? Do you practice sustainability? Do your customers care about your sustainable business practices? Have you told them about your practices? Is there a connection between sustainability and government affairs? The answer is yes there is. One of the key aspects of sustainability in government affairs activity is in using best management practices (BMPs) in your agronomic or environmental practices. Many of the best practices have to do with the protection of water quality; some with saving water through how the landscape is designed. Within the industry, many are concerned that if these practices get defined for us by others, it’ll be through laws or regulations. Some people think they can save money by close scrutiny and adoption of the right BMPs. What is becoming obvious is that saving money and using BMPs does not have to be an all or nothing activity. For example, some people push native vegetation. If the customer... ...

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Tool Tips

  This is the first in a series of articles starting with troubleshooting and ending with how to replace the broken tool:  1. It’s broken, 2. Now what—repair or replace; 3. so what should I buy?  We hope that you  will be able to relate to these situations,  and that the suggestions will be helpful to you. WHAT?  IT’S BROKEN! You’re sitting in your office or driving to your next job, when you get the dreaded call—your employee says the piece of equipment he was using stopped working—“it just died”.   Your first question—what happened?  The invariable response, “I don’t know; it just stopped”. THE NEXT FEW QUESTIONS ARE THE KEYS TO UNRAVELING THE MYSTERY 1.    What stopped?  Did the engine stop?  If it’s a mower, did the mower blades stop?  Was it under load when it stopped?   It is essential to narrow down the problem.   the more specific you can be, the closer you can get to the source of the trouble—ask the right questions. What were you doing... ...

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Featured Pest: The Spiraling Whitefly (Aleurodicus dispersus)

 Hosts: Recorded on 38 genera of plants from 27 plant families and over 100 different species. Common on vegetables, ornamental, fruit and shade tree crops in Hawaii, including avocado, banana, bird-or-paradise, breadfruit, citrus, coconut, eggplant, kamani, Indian banyan, macadamia, mango, palm, paperbark, papaya, pepper, pikake, plumeria, poinsettia, rose, sea grape, ti, and tropical almond. Distribution: Native to Central American and the Caribbean region.  First reported in Hawaii in 1978 and now present on all of the major islands. Damage:  a) Direct – damage caused by piercing and sucking of sap from foliage.  Majority of feeding done during the first three nymphal stages.  Usually insufficient to kill plants. b) Indirect – damage due to accumulated honeydew and white, waxy flocculent material.  The honeydew serves as a substrate for sooty mold, which blackens the leaf and decreases photosynthesis and plant vigor, and can cause disfigurement.  The flocculent material is spread by the wind and can create an unsightly nuisance. c) Virus transmission – damage from virus transmission can be considerable.  These viruses cause over 40... ...

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Tools for Ethical Business Decisions

Most Americans view “business ethics” as an oxymoron, a contradiction in terms.  Many people working in the landscape industry may not think about ethics as all, being too busy submitting bids and getting work done.  However, ethics is a vital issue for the reputation of our industry as a whole and for each business owner and worker in the field.  Hawaii is a special place and it deserves our best – including ethical behavior.   The people who run businesses generally don’t sit down and think “I’m going to do something unethical today.”  We’re all too busy trying to meet deadlines to usually even stop and think about ethics.  Instead, companies tend to embark on an unethical slide one decision at a time.  It could be padding the hours on a time-and-materials invoice, saying that company workers are qualified to do work they have no experience in, or failing to mention a prior verbal commitment when a new customer representative takes over a project.  There’s usually some sort of rationalization: ... ...

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Malama ‘Aina Nanakuli Style: The NFL Youth Education Town Hawaii

In the last couple of years a number of interesting articles have been written about the new NFL Youth Education Town Hawaii facility in Nanakuli.  While most articles have focused on the building and its Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii programs none has focused on its landscape and gardens. The National Football League Youth Education Town (NFL YET) Hawaii, built on 1.61 acres of Hawaiian Home Lands located next to Nanaikapono Elementary School in Nanakuli, is a legacy of the NFL Pro Bowl, which has been played in Hawaii since 1980.  It will be the only YET facility built outside a Super Bowl host city. The NFL YET’s are designed to help youngsters succeed by providing educational assistance, job training, technical instruction, life-skills development, and fitness and recreational outlets. The 10,000-square foot facility is managed by the Boys & Girls Club of Hawaii, which serves more than 14,000 youngsters on Oahu and Kauai, ages 7-17, with programs designed to inspire and enable them to realize their full potential as... ...

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Tool Tips

By Phyllis Jones   Welcome to a new feature in your LICH magazine—the tool section.  In this section we hope to keep you appraised of what is happening in the equipment industry and how it will impact your business.  We will also give you some hints on factors to consider when purchasing new equipment.  We hope that these articles will be helpful to you, and we welcome your questions and feedback. The recent blower ban legislation serves as a reminder of how diverse the landscape industry is—from large and small contractors; to nurseries, golf courses, hotels and resorts, tourist attractions, cemeteries, to equipment vendors.  This blower ban legislation affects us all, and we all could be adversely affected should the ban be passed by the legislature.  This is a great opportunity for us to work together for the common good.  Gas powered tools (2 cycle or 4 cycle) are a necessity for all facets of the landscape industry.  They make good economic sense by reducing labor and time.  In a... ...

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