Review Category : Landscape Hawaii Magazine

Quick Session 1: Creating Meaning From Names

We’re going to have a quick sesh (session) and debrief here before we jump into the real article. So, who rushed out and searched Puku’i & Handy’s Hawaiian Dictionary or  wehewehe.org to understand the notion of “Mahina La’au”?  No worries.  We’ll do it together.  Let’s see what WE can conjure up in terms of a broad image and nomenclature  (image not so much definition) for Mahina La’au.  (btw: la’au is spelled with a macron over the first “a”).  Go to wehewehe.org as we step through this. mahi – to cultivate; a farm; a farmer; plantation patch; Cf. mahi’ai, mahina, mahiku (hint: always good to look up the Cf.’s) mahina -moon, month, moonlight; 2. crescent shaped fishhook; 3. eye of the snail at the end of its horn; 4. farm, plantation, patch; 5. variety of onion similar to silver onion; 6. a variety of sweet potato (you see, I didn’t know this one!) la’au – tree, plant, timber, wood, stick, pole, rod, splinter, thicket, club, blow of a club, strength, rigidness,... ...

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Warranty Does Not Mean Guarranty

HAPPY NEW YEAR READERS!!  Are you off to a good start?  Let’s all commit to becoming more knowledgeable about what we do and how we can do it better.  I’m ready to help in any way that I can, so if you have questions, feel free to ask.  For this issue, let’s start with everyone’s favorite topic, when is a warranty not a warranty? The story I am about to tell is true.  Earlier this year I was making a sales call to an experienced, professional landscaper.  He had purchased a chain saw one month earlier, and I asked him how the saw was working.  It is here that the story begins.  After purchasing the saw, he explained that they brought it back to their shop, took it out of the box, and put fuel in it.  They went to start the saw; it started but would die when they tried to “rev” it up.  They tried several times and the same thing happened; no high rpms.  They took it... ...

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The Renaissance of a Classic – Leilehua Golf Course

Opened in 1949, Leilehua Golf Course has always been considered one of the finest military golf courses worldwide, and a favorite to the local Hawaiian golfing community. So one might ask, “If Leilehua is such a great golf course, why was it recently renovated?”  The answer is a simple. Although the golf course layout was solid, Leilehua had been showing its age for many years and it was evident that it was time for a change.  The large trees had overtaken the fairways, bunkers were holding water, putting surfaces were slow and uninteresting and more tee space was needed. So, in 2010 a professional design/ build team was hired to work with the Army and Leilehua personnel to refurbish the golf course and bring it up to high quality, modern-day standards.  The team comprised of Stellar, golf course architect Mark Miller and DHR Construction, was given a “wish list” and a budget.  Although the task seemed daunting, the team’s main focus from the start was to deliver the entire wish... ...

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Irrigation Programming For 2013

How long do you run your controller for? It’s amazing how often I walk up to an irrigation controller and look at how long each station is scheduled to operate.  Regretfully, it’s more of the norm to see spray heads set to water 15, 20, even 30 minutes every day, applying up to an inch of water, when they only need to run 6 or 7 minutes per day. So how long should you run your systems:  Today, most spray-type sprinklers apply 1.5” to 2” of water per hour?  The average evaporative losses on Oahu are about 0.18” so on an average day, in theory you need to irrigate less than 7 minutes per day to replenish the full ET.  However, not all plants need full ET and not all areas will be the same. A protected shady area of your property may only have losses of 0.12” or less while a dry, windy area that exposed to full sun will be higher.  Each plant type has a different crop... ...

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Loud & Clear

While we’re all aware of a number of recognized economic indicators, probably the most conspicuous for the Kona side of the Big Island is the number of private aircraft now parking at our airport. What this means to us in the landscape industry is not just the arrival of a well-heeled clientele, but even more importantly the basis upon which to confirm a vital message to our elected officials. These visitors and part time residents will not accept a second class setting to invest either their time or money on, and they will go elsewhere in the future if we do not provide for their expectations. It is critical that the landscape industry build on this message and convey its significance to those who are elected to determine the future of these islands. If there is one certainty we need to remember about legislative activity it’s that elected officials almost always give their attention to issues they believe affect or concern the majority of their constituents.  This often involves perspective... ...

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Doing Our Part To Plant Pono

It used to be that the Hawaiian ecosystems with the highest diversity of plant species were moist and wet forests.  Today, the highest plant diversity can be found in our yards and botanical gardens, and the number of plant species introduced to Hawaii grows each year.  Although the vast majority of Earth’s 250,000+ plant species would not be invasive if imported and grown in our islands, a small percentage would be superweeds that alter the ecosystem or natural resources.  Plants are not checked for their potential to become invasive when they are imported, and our noxious seed and weed rules regulate less than 100 species of plants, most of which are already present in Hawai‘i. Now, there is a new website that can help everyone make informed plant choices.  Plant Pono (www.plantpono.org) provides planting information on non-invasive ornamental plants (pono plants), to help you select the right plant for your yard.  These pono plants were selected by noted horticulturist Heidi Bornhorst, and were screened by the Hawaii-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment... ...

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Exceptional Trees

Recently, 22 stately trees at Waimea Valley were approved by the Arborist Advisory Committee to be listed as Exceptional Trees. This program was founded by the State of Hawaii in 1975 to mandate each county to establish a County Arborist Advisory Committee which enacts regulations to protect trees of exceptional stature. Exceptional trees must meet one or more of the following criteria: historic or cultural value, age, rarity, location, size, esthetic quality and endemic status. At Waimea Valley, the new Exceptional Trees include two Monkey Pod (Albizia saman); two Ohe-makai (Reynoldsia sandwicensis); and 18 Wiliwili (Erythrina sandwicensis) trees.  These century-old monkey pod trees with 9 feet diameter trunks awe our guests at the visitor center. These endemic ohe-makai and wiliwili trees were used culturally by the Hawaiians.  Ohe-makai was used to play a game called kukulu`ae`o (stilts).  The soft light wood of the wiliwili is still used for outriggers and occasionally surfboards and was used as fishnet floats.  These exceptional trees existed in the Valley before the Waimea Arboretum and... ...

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Study materials donated to libraries

Thanks to a Kaulunani grant, Aloha Arborist Association (AAA), Western Chapter International Society of Arboriculture (WCISA), and Carol Kwan Consulting, the Hawaii State Public Library System (HSPLS) now has the latest Certified Arborist and Certified Tree Worker study materials statewide. Over $1,800 worth of materials, including study guides, ANSI standards, Best Management Practices, and DVDs, were donated. See sidebar for a complete list of materials. The materials were distributed to Hawaii State Library, Kapolei Public Library, Lihue Public Library, Kahului Public Library, Hilo Public Library, and Kailua-Kona Public Library, but they can be requested and picked up from any of the 50 HSPLS libraries statewide. Visit librarieshawaii.org and search on keyword “arboriculture” for a complete listing of available materials. This publications donation was funded in part by Kaulunani, an Urban & Community Forestry Program of the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service. Carol Kwan is the President of Carol Kwan Consulting, a Certified Arborist, and the Secretary of Aloha Arborist Association The following publications are... ...

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