Review Category : Landscape Hawaii Magazine

Preparing You Drought Management Plan

In the past decade, we’ve seen and heard a lot of new “Buzzwords” in the landscape industry.  Words such as LEED, sustainability, low-impact, urban sprawl, being Green, and many more have become commonplace. Another “buzzword” which has been around for a while, but has never really discussed much in Hawaii is “Drought Management Plan”. Ancient Hawaiian’s had drought management plans, which date back hundreds of years. These laws that governed water usage were known as the Kanawai or “laws of water” and were enforced by a strict Kapu.  Damaging an irrigation system or harming a water source was punishable by death in cases.  Water conservation was the preeminent law of the land and was very successful in supporting Hawaii’s population. Officially, The State of Hawaii implemented the development of their initial modern day “Hawaii Drought Plan” in 2000 and this was updated in 2005, but has really never been implemented on a statewide level.    Prior to then, drought was addressed as a temporary emergency and actions that were taken in... ...

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Larval Defoliators of Monkeypod (Samamea Saman) Strike Again

The Monkeypod, is a popular landscape tree in Hawaii.  It grows in many other tropical areas of the world, although it‘s native range is the northern region of South America and Central America south of El Salvador.  The Monkeypod is recognized for its umbrella-like canopy and leaflet closure which allows sunlight and rain to filter down to its roots so that the grass grows right up to its massive trunk.  Because of the tree’s dominant place in the landscape, it becomes readily apparent if this giant is under siege and looses its foliage.  Unfortunately, since the 1970’s, this is what occurs nearly every year somewhere in Hawaii’s landscape when the Monkeypod defoliators strike. The triad of defoliators which attack the Monkeypod tree are the Monkeypod-kiawe caterpillar (Melipotis indomita (Walker)), the black witch caterpillar (Ascalapha odorata (L.)) and the caterpillar of the Monkeypod moth (Polydesma umbricola Boisduval).  Of the three, the most severe pest of Monkeypod is the Monkeypod-kiawe caterpillar which usually makes up more than 98% of the larvae collected... ...

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Shape Hawaii’s Future & Yours in 5 Minutes

“Healthy citizens are the greatest asset any country can have.” – Winston Churchill The legislative session opened January 16th and LICH is tracking and testifying on 11 legislative bills that could benefit or harm our island environment and the landscape industry. The bills propose changes to the laws for nuisance trees, leaf blowers, landscape architect’s license, graywater usage, permeable paving and irrigation water conservation. As an expert on these issues, legislators want to hear from you on these important issues. If not you, then who? It’s up to each of us to be engaged and take time during the legislative session too weigh in on these issues. LICH is testifying on the legislative bills below. By the time you receive this magazine these bills may have changed or died. LICH supports the following bills: GRAY WATER – Senate Bill 454 Encourages the department of health and the counties to promote widespread use of gray water in the interests of water conservation. Clarifies that guidelines for the use of gray water... ...

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Quick Session 1: Creating Meaning From Names

We’re going to have a quick sesh (session) and debrief here before we jump into the real article. So, who rushed out and searched Puku’i & Handy’s Hawaiian Dictionary or  wehewehe.org to understand the notion of “Mahina La’au”?  No worries.  We’ll do it together.  Let’s see what WE can conjure up in terms of a broad image and nomenclature  (image not so much definition) for Mahina La’au.  (btw: la’au is spelled with a macron over the first “a”).  Go to wehewehe.org as we step through this. mahi – to cultivate; a farm; a farmer; plantation patch; Cf. mahi’ai, mahina, mahiku (hint: always good to look up the Cf.’s) mahina -moon, month, moonlight; 2. crescent shaped fishhook; 3. eye of the snail at the end of its horn; 4. farm, plantation, patch; 5. variety of onion similar to silver onion; 6. a variety of sweet potato (you see, I didn’t know this one!) la’au – tree, plant, timber, wood, stick, pole, rod, splinter, thicket, club, blow of a club, strength, rigidness,... ...

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Warranty Does Not Mean Guarranty

HAPPY NEW YEAR READERS!!  Are you off to a good start?  Let’s all commit to becoming more knowledgeable about what we do and how we can do it better.  I’m ready to help in any way that I can, so if you have questions, feel free to ask.  For this issue, let’s start with everyone’s favorite topic, when is a warranty not a warranty? The story I am about to tell is true.  Earlier this year I was making a sales call to an experienced, professional landscaper.  He had purchased a chain saw one month earlier, and I asked him how the saw was working.  It is here that the story begins.  After purchasing the saw, he explained that they brought it back to their shop, took it out of the box, and put fuel in it.  They went to start the saw; it started but would die when they tried to “rev” it up.  They tried several times and the same thing happened; no high rpms.  They took it... ...

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The Renaissance of a Classic – Leilehua Golf Course

Opened in 1949, Leilehua Golf Course has always been considered one of the finest military golf courses worldwide, and a favorite to the local Hawaiian golfing community. So one might ask, “If Leilehua is such a great golf course, why was it recently renovated?”  The answer is a simple. Although the golf course layout was solid, Leilehua had been showing its age for many years and it was evident that it was time for a change.  The large trees had overtaken the fairways, bunkers were holding water, putting surfaces were slow and uninteresting and more tee space was needed. So, in 2010 a professional design/ build team was hired to work with the Army and Leilehua personnel to refurbish the golf course and bring it up to high quality, modern-day standards.  The team comprised of Stellar, golf course architect Mark Miller and DHR Construction, was given a “wish list” and a budget.  Although the task seemed daunting, the team’s main focus from the start was to deliver the entire wish... ...

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Irrigation Programming For 2013

How long do you run your controller for? It’s amazing how often I walk up to an irrigation controller and look at how long each station is scheduled to operate.  Regretfully, it’s more of the norm to see spray heads set to water 15, 20, even 30 minutes every day, applying up to an inch of water, when they only need to run 6 or 7 minutes per day. So how long should you run your systems:  Today, most spray-type sprinklers apply 1.5” to 2” of water per hour?  The average evaporative losses on Oahu are about 0.18” so on an average day, in theory you need to irrigate less than 7 minutes per day to replenish the full ET.  However, not all plants need full ET and not all areas will be the same. A protected shady area of your property may only have losses of 0.12” or less while a dry, windy area that exposed to full sun will be higher.  Each plant type has a different crop... ...

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Loud & Clear

While we’re all aware of a number of recognized economic indicators, probably the most conspicuous for the Kona side of the Big Island is the number of private aircraft now parking at our airport. What this means to us in the landscape industry is not just the arrival of a well-heeled clientele, but even more importantly the basis upon which to confirm a vital message to our elected officials. These visitors and part time residents will not accept a second class setting to invest either their time or money on, and they will go elsewhere in the future if we do not provide for their expectations. It is critical that the landscape industry build on this message and convey its significance to those who are elected to determine the future of these islands. If there is one certainty we need to remember about legislative activity it’s that elected officials almost always give their attention to issues they believe affect or concern the majority of their constituents.  This often involves perspective... ...

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