Review Category : Native Species

Students rally to submit 10 landscape research poster abstract

It’s two weeks before the conference and there’s 10 terrific student abstracts submitted on landscape research projects. Click the link below for a preview of the 2013 LICH Student Poster Abstracts and learn the latest research by UH students. http://hawaiiscape.wpengine.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/2013-LICH-Student-Poster-Abstracts.pdf For more information on the criteria for submitting a research abstract go to: http://hawaiiscape.wpengine.com/studentposterabstracts/ ...

Read More →

New LICH Native Plant Poster

LICH announces new double sided color native plant poster. The poster features 36 native plants perfect for your projects. The front is designed for retail locations showing large pictures and featuring a QR code. The back of the poster includes detailed horticultural information and features information on the ethical use of native plants. Click here for the LICH Native Plant Poster, a 13″ by 17″ reduced size PDF of the native plant poster ...

Read More →

Feeling the Urge to Write a Native Plant Article?

Well look no further, the next issue of Landscape Hawaii magazine is our native plant issue featuring a free native plant poster. The magazine has a readership of 20,450 and is mailed to 6,000 addresses every two months. Our audience is the Hawaii landscape professionals. If you would like to write an article for next issue of Landscape Hawaii magazine, please choose a topic below and write either 600-750 words or 1200-1500 words. Submit 2-3 jpeg images at a minimum size of 1 MB. For an article submission example visit us online at: http://hawaiiscape.wpengine.com/landscape-hawaii-magazine Topics we would love to see articles address (but feel free to write to another topic): • Great native plant alternatives to popular ornamentals • How to ethically and legally collect native plants • Native plant propagation and seed storage • Review of the best native plant resources – books, native nurseries and websites. • Designing with native plant communities • How to design Ethnobotanical gardens • The ethical use of Native plant guidelines (monoculture vs diversity,... ...

Read More →

Propagation of Ohia, Metrosideros Polymorpha Using Vegetative Cuttings

At the University of Hawaii in Manoa, we operate a fungal disease laboratory and confirm the pathogenicity of new fungi on local plants.  Healthy disease free plants are needed for these tests and plants are propagated by employing clean seeds or cuttings.  These healthy plants are required to test the infectivity of new fungi, to document early symptoms and to record disease progress. For ohia or Metrosideros polymorpha, we commonly use seeds for propagation.  However, it takes many years to produce a plant ready for pathogenicity testing, as well as for retail or for out planting for commercial operations.  Alternatively, by using vegetative cuttings, propagation is faster and clones can be made from valuable plants.  The following describes basic procedures used to propagate ohia from cuttings. Gathering cuttings:  When going into the field to obtain cuttings of ohia plants, it is important to keep the cuttings hydrated and vigorous.  Thus bring a bucket of water to place the cut ends of the cuttings in it.  If specific trees are selected,... ...

Read More →

Doing Our Part To Plant Pono

It used to be that the Hawaiian ecosystems with the highest diversity of plant species were moist and wet forests.  Today, the highest plant diversity can be found in our yards and botanical gardens, and the number of plant species introduced to Hawaii grows each year.  Although the vast majority of Earth’s 250,000+ plant species would not be invasive if imported and grown in our islands, a small percentage would be superweeds that alter the ecosystem or natural resources.  Plants are not checked for their potential to become invasive when they are imported, and our noxious seed and weed rules regulate less than 100 species of plants, most of which are already present in Hawai‘i. Now, there is a new website that can help everyone make informed plant choices.  Plant Pono (www.plantpono.org) provides planting information on non-invasive ornamental plants (pono plants), to help you select the right plant for your yard.  These pono plants were selected by noted horticulturist Heidi Bornhorst, and were screened by the Hawaii-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment... ...

Read More →