2019 LICH  Green Industry Annual Conference
Monday, October 14, 2019
Hawaii Convention Center
1801 Kalakaua Avenue, Honolulu, Hawaii

Each year, LICH brings together landscape industry participants from every island to network, build alliances, study, and share advances in every field of our industry.

The 2019 Landscape Industry Council of Hawai‘i’s Green Industry Annual Conference is being held at the Hawai‘i Convention Center on October 14, 2019 with the theme “Strengthening Our Roots”. Registration includes full-day access to the plenary session, concurrent sessions, exhibitor tables, 1 continental breakfast and 1 lunch. CEUs will be available for Restricted Use Pesticide applicators, Landscape Industry Certified Technicians, and Certified Arborists.

This year LICH will partner with
THE HAWAII AGRICULTURE CONFERENCE
hosted by the Agricultural Leadership Foundation
which will be held right after the LICH Conference on
October 15 and 16, 2019.

ONLINE  LICH CONFERENCE REGISTRATION
Important; To Claim the Member Discount,
use the code TREE19

 

Member Price becomes $175 / Non Member $210

Click Here

EXHIBITOR AND SPONSORSHIP
OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE NOW
Exhibitor tables are available for our Vendor Sponsors
KOA @ $750 / MILO @ $500 / OHIA @ $350
For more information and Registration Forms
Click Here

Need to know if you are a 2019 LICH Member? click here
Not a member? Join now! click here

 Conference Schedule and list of speakers

Track Time Topic / Title Speaker

7:00 am to 7:55 am

Registration

General

8:00 am – 8:05 am

Welcome

Russell Galanti

General

8:10 am – 8:30 am

 President’s Speech

 President, Chris McCullough

Key Note

8:30 am – 9:10 am

OLA: O’AHU RESILIENCE STRATEGY

Launched in spring 2019, the O‘ahu Resilience Strategy articulates 44 discrete actions to address resilience challenges and opportunities identified from a comprehensive engagement and research process. The Resilience Strategy stands on four main pillars and the need to act together to address these issues and opportunities: Remaining Rooted – Ensuring an Affordable Future for Our Island; Bouncing Forward – Fostering Resilience in the Face of Natural Disaster; Climate Security – Tackling Climate Change by Reducing Emissions and Adapting to Impacts; Community Cohesion – Leveraging the Strength and Leadership of Local Communities. More than 2,200 community members directly contributed to the process along with dozens of organizations; nearly 100 working group members; a 21-member Resilience Strategy Steering Committee; a City Resilience Team; other City department staff; and the Office of Climate Change, Sustainability & Resiliency staff, interns, and AmeriCorps VISTAs. This Resilience Strategy was written by the community. Over an 18-month period grassroots residents and community leaders helped shape and craft the 44 resilience actions that form the body of this strategy and lay a path to a resilient future for O‘ahu. The strategy proposes several actions to address water management, heat, and green communities, involving many City agencies, other governmental partners, and the professional sector. Learn about the Resilience Strategy, these specific actions, and opportunities to improve O‘ahu’s resilience.

Matthew Gonser joined the City and County of Honolulu’s Office of Climate Change, Sustainability and Resiliency in October 2017. His position focuses on coastal and water issues and opportunities, with attention to community planning and design, natural hazards mitigation, sea level rise and climate change adaptation, and green infrastructure and stormwater management.

9:15 am to 10:15 am

Session One

 
T1

Arborist / Contractor

CONSIDERATION OF STERILE LEUCAENA HYBRIDS AS LANDSCAPE TREES IN HAWAII
Although Leucaena in Hawaii is synonymous with the weedy “koa haole”, there is sufficient genetic diversity in the genus that multiple seedless hybrids have been developed at the University of Hawaii for wood production, livestock fodder, crop shade and wind protection. Some of these hybrids have been planted as landscape trees and exhibit promising characteristics for adoption by the landscape industry. These include fast growth but reasonable maximum size, moderate shade cast, few pest and disease problems, broad environmental tolerance, good response to pruning, and the ability to be propagated vegetatively using a variety of methods. This presentation will summarize our work on several promising sterile hybrids as multipurpose trees with consideration for how they could perform as landscape trees.
TRAVIS IDOL
Dr. Travis Idol is professor of tropical forestry and agroforestry at the University of Hawaii-Manoa. He has studied the use of sterile hybrid Leucaena for agroforestry purposes and is now interested in promoting their evaluation as a landscape tree.
T2

Pests & Pest Management

PREVENT WATER CONTAMINATION WITH YOUR PESTICIDES
This presentation is about carefully handling and applying pesticides to control weeds, insects, plant diseases or other types of pest. Pesticide users will understand five ideas: (1) Pesticides can move through air, soil and water, even before and after you apply it. (2) Some pesticides may readily move into surface water and groundwater. (3) Surface water and groundwater provide most of the vital fresh water that you and I and wildlife must have. (4) A pesticide label explains how to prevent or control the pesticide’s movement in air, soil and water.” (5) You must read and heed “mandatory” statements on your pesticide’s label.
CHARLES NAGAMINE
Charles Nagamine is the instructor for the University of Hawaii’s pesticide safety education program known as the “Pesticide Risk Reduction Education” program. He cooperates with staff of the Pesticides Branch of the Hawaii Department of Agriculture, which is the state agency that regulates Hawaii’s pesticide distributors and users.
T3

Nursery & Design

PLANT PONO, THE EASY WAY TO BE GREEN
The shift in consumer preference toward eco-conscious services and products offers both a challenge and an opportunity for the landscaping industry. Plantpono.org is a free, online tool that can help you find the best non-invasive plants for any situation, giving you the opportunity to offer confidence and pride to your clients, knowing that their choices are pono for the islands. Improve your efficiency in selecting the right plants for different climates and zone types in Hawaii, and how to expand your use of native plants to meet consumer interest and create more authentic Hawaiian landscapes. From a person planting their first garden to landscape architects designing major projects, plantpono.org is intended to guide all who garden to make Pono planting choices. We invite you to learn more!
MOLLY MURPHY
Molly Murphy has dedicated her life to protecting Hawai‘i’s native ecosystems from invasive species. Part botanical historian and part plant detective, Molly is the Plant Pono Specialist for the Big Island Invasive Species Committee (BIISC). She manages the website for plantpono.org, speaks at public events, and writes about invasive species issues.
 
 

10:15 am to 11:00 am

Break 1 Visit our Exhibitor Tables!

11:00 am to 12: pm

Session Two

T1

Arborist / Contractor

TREES ARE OUR FUTURE
Trees provide multiple benefits, as we all know, at a very efficient cost/benefit ratio. Then why is there an element of our population that perceives trees as a nuisance to be eliminated? Then why do we continue to create tree-less heat islands in our community? Why are not trees the highest municipal priority? How do we create a different community-wide mind set about trees? We have to provide a new story that moves our people to become not only lovers of trees but fervent advocates for trees. We have a steep hill to climb and it will take all of us to make Honolulu a city among the trees.
TOM DINELL
Dinell is President Emeritus of Trees for Honolulu’s Future and its founder. He is also Professor Emeritus of Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Hawaii at Manoa. He served as co-chair of the Steering Committee for making Honolulu an Age-Friendly City. He played a key role in establishing the Complete Streets Program in Honolulu. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Certified Planners (FAICP).
T2

Pests & Pest Management

RESEARCH UPDATES ON MANAGEMENT OF SEVERAL IMPORTANT LANDSCAPE AND TURFGRASS PESTS IN HAWAII
This presentation will provide the latest updates on my on-going research projects in management of several important landscape and turfgrass pests in Hawaii, such as coconut rhinoceros beetle, lobate lac scale, Ficus stem and leaf gall wasps, and frit fly. Efficacies of various insecticides against these pests in lab experiments and/or field trials will be presented. Potential biological control of coconut rhinoceros beetle will also be discussed. Further, the latest state-wide distribution of lobate lac scale in Hawaii will be covered. 
ZHIQIANG CHENG

Dr. Zhiqiang Cheng is an Associate Professor and Extension Specialist in the Dept. of Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, CTAHR, UH Manoa, with 15 years of research experience on biology, ecology, and management of turfgrass and landscape pests, as well as on soil ecology, and environmental bio-indicators.

T3

Nursery & Design

Pāʻūohiʻiaka (JACQUEMONTIA SANDWICENSIS) SELECTIONS FOR HANGING BASKET USE
Pāʻūohiʻiaka (Jacquemontia sandwicensis) is an endemic coastal vine used mainly as a groundcover in landscapes. Although it possesses a trailing growth habit, it has not been frequently used as a potted or hanging basket plant. Currently, there is very little work being done to identify selections of pāʻūohiʻiaka suited for hanging baskets. In this study, we evaluated the hanging basket potential of six accessions from Oahu, Maui and Hawaii.
ORVILLE BALDOS

Orville C. Baldos is an assistant researcher in the Department of Tropical Plant and Soil Sciences. His research interest focuses on screening, evaluation, propagation and production of native and non-invasive ornamental plant materials for landscape and floriculture use.

 

 

 
 

12 pm to 1:00 pm

Break 2: Box Lunch, Visit our Exhibitor Tables

 
 

1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Session Three

T1

Arborist / Contractor

TREE CARE GUIDELINES AND BEST PRACTICES NEAR MANU-O-KU (WHITE TERN) BREEDING SITES

The Manu-o-Kū, or White Tern, is an increasingly abundant native bird that lays its eggs in trees in urban Honolulu. New guidelines and best practices developed in 2019 helped debunk old myths and create consensus on tree care best practices near manu-o-Kū breeding sites. Tree and landscape services that learn and apply the best practices will excel at working with property owners and managers whose trees have manu-o-Kū breeding sites. This talk is an introduction to Manu-o-Kū biology and breeding behavior; federal and state protection of the species; job planning, including how to use online data to locate breeding sites in your job area; behavior-defined buffer zones; emergency procedures; rescue of chicks and injured adults; and other related topics.

RICH DOWNS and
ANGELA LIU
Rich Downs is the coordinator of Hui Manu-o- Kū, a coalition of organizations with the mission of enhancing awareness, appreciation, understanding and conservation of manu-o-Kū, or White Terms in Hawaii.
Angela Liu, is Arborist for the HI Department of Education Facilities Maintenance Branch.  In 2019, she coordinated the Kaulunani Program project Guidelines and Best Practices for Tree Care Near Manu-o-Kū Breeding Sites on behalf of the Aloha Arborist Association.
T2

Pests & Pest Management

THE CURRENT STATE OF THE RED GINGER (ALPINIA PURPURATA) AND CURRENT ISSUES FACING OAHU
Dr. John Hu:
Growers of ornamental flowering ginger on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, have recently reported outbreaks of a disease causing severe dieback and threatening crop yield and quality. Virus-like symptoms were observed on red ginger [Alpinia purpurata (Vieillard) K. Schumann] from several locations. Plant badnaviruses and a potyvirus have previously been reported on flowering ginger in Hawaii. Symptoms appear on plants infected with single or multiple combinations of viruses.anana streak virus and bean common mosaic virus, were detected from symptomatic flowering ginger plants recently. Research is currently being done to examine the etiology of the disease using PCR-based assays to discern the involvement of the above-mentioned viruses and to develop strategies to manage these diseases in ginger. Russelll Galanti: This talk will segway from the presentation of Dr. John Hu on virus identification in ginger. Topics will include other possible pathogens as well as control methods for the disease. The presentation will also cover other disease and pest issues facing Oahu as well as an update on the ornamental extension program for the island.

Dr JOHN HU
obtained his PhD degree from Cornell University in 1987. He has been a plant virologist in CTAHR, UHM since 1990 and has been working on viruses infecting banana, pineapple, and other tropical crops in Hawaii.
RUSSELL GALANTI
Russell Galanti is the CTAHR Cooperative Extension ornamental and landscaping extension agent for Oahu. He works in applicable research and outreach for the floriculture, nursery crop, and landscaping industries for the island. Research is focused on disease, pest, and cultural management of crops as well as variety trialing
T3

Nursery & Design

GROWING, PLANTING, PRUNING, HARVESTING AND COOKING WITH BREADFRUIT TREES
Learn how to grow, prepare for planting, Prune properly and harvest and cook Breadfruit
HIEDI BORNHORST
Certified Arborist, Horticulturist, Landscape Designer, Consultant and Garden Writer, with many years of Green Industry work and life experience. One Papale (hat) she wears is that of O`ahu Breadfruit tree Coordinator with the Breadfruit Institute (BFI)/ National Tropical Botanical Garden. With grant funding, more than 10 thousand `ulu trees were given to gardeners and farmers here in Hawaii. This talk will share some of the information and stories that we learned.

2:00 pm
to 3 pm

Session Four

 
 T1

Arborist / Contractor

MANAGING FOR HEALTHY OHIA IN THE ERA OF RAPID OHIA DEATH
Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death continues to devastate forests across Hawai‘i Island and new outbreaks have been found on Kaua‘i and on Maui. The disease is likely spread by several means, some of which, such as transport of infected wood, can be avoided or managed. The fungi enter the tree through wounds or injuries, and management of wounding both in the landscape and in the forest can greatly reduce mortality. In the built environment, landscapers can install mulch and barriers around ‘ōhi‘a to avoid wounding by lawnmowers and string trimmers. In the forest, fencing of areas and removal of feral ungulates has been shown to drastically reduce infection. Research is ongoing on the role of ambrosia beetles in spreading the disease and possible tools to manage beetle infestations.
JAMES FRIDAY

J. B. Friday is the extension forester for the University of Hawaii. He works with landowners, tree farmers, and professional foresters throughout the state on topics including forest health, restoration of native forests, silviculture of koa, and agroforestry. Dr. Friday earned a bachelor’s degree in biology from Dartmouth College, a master’s in forestry from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, and a PhD in agriculture from the University of Hawaii

T2

Pests & Pest Management

WEED CONTROL UPDATE FOR PERRENIAL GRASSY WEED CONTROL IN TURF AND QUATIC WEED IN THE WAIPIO SOCCER COMPLEX RESERVOIR
GRASSY WEED CONTROL UPDATE FOR HAWAII’S SPORT TURF
Presentation on proposed methods for managing Bermuda and Goose Grass in Seashore Paspalum sport turf and preliminary research into the chemical control of an aquatic weed Elodea. A brief summary of herbicides labeled for perennial grassy weed control and new research results the herbicide Manuscript on 2 perennial grassy weeds in Hawaii’s sports turf
DR. JOSEPH DeFRANK

Dr. DeFrank has 35 years of service at the University of Hawaii at Manoa as a Weed Scientist. He has conducted research in ground cover establishment and herbicides used in vegetable and ornamental crops. Recent projects include developing establishment protocols and seed production methods for native Hawaiian plants in roadside landscapes. Dr. DeFrank provides a variety of outreach lectures for Master Gardeners, DOD pesticide applicators and local turf managers.

T3

Nursery & Design

CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE LANDSCAPE INDUSTRY – ANTICIPATING CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
How will the concerns for climate change affect the practice and art of the landscape industry? How can the industry anticipate coming changes in aesthetics, goals, materials, and methods of landscape design and installation in the face of climate change concerns? What will be the role that the landscape industry can perform in helping to implementing climate change solutions.
In what ways will the landscape industry likely be reactive or proactive?
RICHARD QUINN

Richard Quinn is a licensed Landscape Architect and is a partner at HHF Planners in Honolulu. He has 35 years of experience with a wide range of landscape design projects in Hawai’i and throughout the Pacific and Asia. The incorporation of the principles of sustainable and regenerative designs has become an integral part of his design approach. He is in private practice as a landscape architect, is a certified arborist, is on the Board of Parks and Recreation for Honolulu, is a board member of the Landscape Industry Council of Hawai’i.

 

 

3:00 pm
to 3:30 pm

Break 3: Visit our Exhibitor Tables!

3:30 pm to 4:30 pm

Session Five

 
T1

Arborist / Contractor

WHAT IT TAKES TO PRESERVE A TEN MILLION DOLLAR LANDMARK TREE ON WAIKIKI
Trees have extensive root systems that can sustain mortal injuries during construction. Preparing a tree preservation plan and properly implementing it throughout construction can preserve our urban forests for decades to come. Various construction techniques will be discussed, including methods that can be used to comply with the new storm water rules that impact the landscaping industry.
STEVE NIMZ

In 2014, Waikiki’s quirky International Market Place was demolished to establish a multi-story high-end retail and restaurant complex. The land owners recognized the iconic and exceptional Banyan as the focal feature of the original Market Place and chose to preserve it in the new development, despite the large volume of prime real estate the tree occupies. My responsibility as Project Arborist was to establish a mutualistic relationship with the developers, design team, contractors and land owners, to do everything possible to preserve the Banyan’s health and structure, and still construct the project. Designing around a 90-ft. tree with a 220-ft. crown spread took an enormous amount of planning and coordination. While the standard arborist tasks involved working with the designers and developers prior to construction, establishing a tree protection plan, and overseeing all work that could impact the Banyan, the real challenge was making them believe in the tree.

T2

Pests & Pest Management

PEST BOLO’S (BE ON THE LOOKOUT!). LANDSCAPERS ARE PART OF THE EARLY DETECTION NETWORK IN HAWAI’I

As landscapers, you already have an eye for plants and can play an integral part of the early detection network to help report invasive pests in Hawai‘i. Your average day-to-day may not encounter anything that catches your eye, but if you’ve ever said, “What the #@*% is THAT?”…we want to know! OISC will present information about some of these pests you may encounter and how to report them. From new, invasive plants to stinging insects…your help can be crucial in detecting pests that are targeted for eradication. This presentation will cover what they are, what they do, and most importantly how you can report them

 

ERIN BIHOP

Erin Bishop is the Outreach Specialist for the O‘ahu Invasive Species Committee. She has
worked in community outreach and education for ten years and is a graduate of Hawai‘i Pacific
University with a BA in Environmental Studies.

 

T3

Nursery & Design

NEW SELECTIONS FOR THE HAWAIIAN PLANT PALLET

Tired of using pōhinahina, ʻakia and naupaka in your landscapes? This discussion will cover plants both native and Polynesian introduced that we have recently or will soon release from our nursery for the landscape industry. With each new species Iʻll also cover proper placement and maintenance and additional uses both culturally and ecologically It will also cover plants that I have been available for some time, have a great potential but aren’t utilized as often as they should be

RICK BARBOZA

Rick Barboza has been propagating native Hawaiian plants for over 22 years and is co-owner of Hui Kū Maoli Ola, LLC Native Hawaiian Plant Nursery and Landscaping Company and co-founder of Papahana Kuaola, a cultural-educational non-profit. Both organizations are devoted to the preservation and rehabilitation of Hawaiiʻs natural history and culture.